The Year of the Snake


Posted:   |  More posts about python

If you know your Chinese Zodiac calendar like I do, you know that 2013 is the year of the snake. While they don't specify the type of snake, I think they mean Python.

2012 was a pretty good year around the Python community. It was fun while it lasted, but 2013, the year of the snake, is going to be even better.

Python 3 continues to grow, conferences continue to grow, and diversity continues to grow. These three things are topics I hope we all have a chance to be involved in for 2013.

Python 3

Python 3 adoption is moving along swiftly, and I'm looking forward to another year of increased usage, contribution, and conversation. You don't have to look too far to see that Python 3 is growing. The website formerly known as the "Python 3 Wall of Shame" recently became "Python 3 Wall of Superpowers" as the projects it tracks hit 50% with support for 3.x.

The "Who's on Python 3?" page uses additional knowledge to show projects with support under way, and it claims that 74% of the top 50 downloaded packages have 3.x support. When you include the in-progress projects, e.g., Django, that number becomes 78%.

Georg Brandl's tracking of Python 3 packages on PyPI shows strong growth, as 2011 ended with around 600 packages showing support for Python 3, and 2012 ended around 1,400. While that only puts us around 6% of all packages, it's an imperfect metric. Many projects don't even specify that they support Python 2, and known Python 3 projects don't specify their support either. It's still nice to see that the support is at least doubled. (PSA: Please accurately set the trove classifiers on your PyPI packages!)

Note

The following uses Windows download counts from http://python.org/webstats, as parsed by https://bitbucket.org/briancurtin/pydotorg_webstats. These are probably the only reliable numbers we can get since most platforms receive Python in some other way, e.g., package managers.

Downloads for all Python versions saw a boost in 2012 to just under 2,000,000 downloads per month (we hovered around 1.7M/month in years ending 2009-2011). December closed out the year as the single largest month ever for Python 3 downloads at 666,884 for Python 3.3. Those 3.3 downloads contributed to a total of 850,399 downloads across all 3.x versions, the highest monthly total to date. In the same period 2.7 saw 903,605 downloads, the lowest count since February, adding up to 1.2M for all 2.x versions.

http://i.imgur.com/XeOAt.png

We saw immediate growth at the initial release of 3.0 back in December 2008, then a settling shortly after, but it looks like we're back into a growth period thanks to a few big months following the 3.3 release in September.

3.x downloads in 2012 were up around 15% compared to 2011, and I think the success of Python 3.3 will continue. The outlook for Python 3.4 is even better than that of 3.3, and we're still early in the cycle. Even though the final release won't come until early 2014, the release will be feature complete by year's end, per PEP 429.

Overall, I like where we're heading. There are several big projects with progress on Python 3 support, such as Django and Twisted. On the PSF board, we recently funded two projects, Kivy and NLTK, to complete their porting to Python 3. Even my day job at Canonical is going to get back into Python 3, as I'll need to complete the port of our SSO client which was started in the fall.

Conferences

Another year means another set of conferences, and 2012 saw a lot of growth here. Not only were there several first time conferences, several established conferences saw attendance increases.

The increase in regional conferences really is a great thing, as they get more people involved in sharing and education, they're generally more affordable than the bigger events, and they expose more people to the fun of a Python conference. I know of five new events that sprouted in 2012:

I hope to see more of these regional conferences in 2013. I'm going to try and make it to at least one of the smaller conferences this year - maybe PyOhio.

As for attendance growth, it's not something most conferences end up mentioning, but I'm aware of it through my work with the Python Software Foundation's board of directors. In 2012 we sponsored 18 conferences, and we figure out our grant amounts based on attendance estimates. We work with organizers that we trust, and most of them mentioned increased attendance estimates, often making their funding requests after pre-sales, so they've had data to support the requests.

The one conference I know for sure had attendance growth was PyCon US, which actually over shot the estimates and opened the conference to 2,317 attendees, up from 1,380 in 2011. In 2013 we're capping the attendance at 2,500, and we're expecting another sell out for the last year in Santa Clara before heading to Montreal.

I'm really looking forward to expansion in the regional conference scene, as I think it'll bring Python to a lot more people. When you consider the download rates from earlier and the increasing attendance at these events, there are a lot of people to be reached in 2013.

Diversity

I certainly can't quantify this, but I've really felt the increasing presence of the various groups in our community that target and involve women. PyLadies and CodeChix saw expansion in 2012, and LadyCoders was created in 2012. Women Who Code joined the aforementioned groups in sponsoring PyCon, and they held over 100 meetings throughout the year. These groups and others were involved in a number of workshops, meetups, sprints, and other efforts to involve women in computing. This is awesome.

At PyCon 2012, several women's groups had booths in the expo hall, and at least one of them hosted a party on one of the evenings. Since PyCon doesn't track attendee genders, there is again no way to quantify this, but in my talks with some of the women at the booths as well as other attendees, PyCon had noticeably more women in attendance than in past years. This is awesome.

Several of these groups held meetups to brainstorm ideas for conference proposals, in an effort to help their members get presentations into conferences like PyCon. PyCon 2011 had one female on the schedule of tutorials and talks. PyCon 2012 had six females on the schedule. PyCon 2013 has 22. This is awesome.

These outreach groups really are working, and I hope to see continued growth because 16.5% of the schedule being women is way too low. It's a great effort on their part, in fact I couldn't be any happier with these groups for what they've done to diversify our community, but we need more. However, what I think we need comes more from everyone else. The women are doing their part.

Whether it's grant programs or the codes of conduct that many events are now implementing, creating a more welcoming environment for everyone will enable more of this growth that the groups are building. From conferences to user group meetings to mailing lists, I hope everyone can think about what we can do to involve more women and tip the scales toward equality.


Overall, I'm really excited about this year. I think it'll be a big year for Python 3, we're going to see some great conferences, and hopefully we're able to get more people involved in Python activities.

I'm also looking forward to putting in more development work on CPython, and I'm looking forward to another great year of working with the PSF. I'm looking forward to more heavy lifting in the gym, doing a Tough Mudder, and having another successful season umpiring college baseball.

Contents © 2014 Brian Curtin